'The dead person was often buried in a religious habit, Brown for the Franciscans and Blue for mostly young girls '

File: http://www.lifehistoriesarchive.com/Files/HBS16.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

'The dead person was often buried in a religious habit, Brown for the Franciscans and Blue for mostly young girls '

Description

Harry Browne describes the burial practices and customs from his childhood. He goes on to remember the common modes of transport and the hard labour that was common in those days.

Creator

Harry Browne

Publisher

Trinity College Dublin

Date

1948

Rights

This item is protected by original copyright

Access Rights

This content may be downloaded and used (with attribution) for research, teaching or private study. It may not be used for commercial purposes without permission.

Relation

Harry Browne

Is Part Of

Childhood and Early Life

Type

Life Story

Spatial Coverage

Russell Avenue, North Strand, Dublin

Temporal Coverage

1940's

Life Story Item Type Metadata

Text

People often died at home with family and friends gathered around the death bed praying and saying Rosaries. The dead person was often buried in a religious habit, Brown for the Franciscans and Blue for mostly young girls. Habits were often worn in the colours of the various Sodalities to which one belonged. Whilst in their last moments the dying person's arm was placed in the sleeve of the habit as they were not yet in Heaven but after death they were fully dressed in the habit as they were then fully in Heaven. Family members wore black for a year and a day after the death ( sometimes just a ribbon) and elderly widows often wore 'widows weeds' until they died. Prominent modes of transport in Dublin in the 1940s included bicycles, buses, trams and foot traffic. There was a business in Granby Lane which rented out horse drawn carts, without horses, which had to supplied by the renter and handcarts. The handcarts were smaller than the horse drawn type and could be rented by the day. Men rented these vehicles and then sought employment as transporters of the most wildly disparate items throughout the city. My uncle Jack employed one such individual to deliver suites of sitting room furniture to clients from one end of the city to the other. The handcart was often laden with three suites, consisting of two armchairs and a sofa. The full load was therefore three sofas and six armchairs. This unwieldy load was then pushed to its various destinations by one small man. Depending on the load and the hills to be encountered on the journey, the carrier might, at his own expense, employ a helper, mostly a small boy to help push the handcart and to offload the furniture at its destination. This type of brutal hard labour was all too common in those less enlightened times.

Sponsor

Irish Research Council for Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences (IRCHSS)

Research Coordinator/P.I.

Dr Kathleen McTiernan (Trinity College Dublin)

Senior Research Associate

Dr Deirdre O'Donnell (Trinity College Dublin)

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